Hitting The Beach? Vacation Survey Shows Mixed Plans

By Christina Estes
Published: Friday, July 12, 2019 - 4:35pm
Updated: Friday, July 12, 2019 - 9:50pm

bulldog enjoying san diego sunset
Christina Estes/KJZZ
Sunset in San Diego, California, in 2018.

A survey about summer vacations shows some mixed plans among Americans.

First, the big numbers: $2,037 is the average amount Americans are expected to spend on summer trips. And it’s the largest amount since Allianz Global Assistance began its annual vacation confidence index a decade ago.

But only 42% of respondents are confident they’ll take a summer vacation this year. That’s near the lowest point in the survey’s history, which was 40% in 2013.

More than half (52%) who are not confident about taking a vacation cite financial concerns, while 38% are restricted by time constraints.

The survey found Gen X’ers, six-figure income earners, and those who think a vacation is important are more likely to typically take vacations. The index found 49% of Americans say they typically take an annual summer trip, which is a 3 percentage point increase from 2018.

The national poll conducted by Ipsos Public Affairs defines a vacation as taking place at least 100 miles away from home for a minimum of one week.

 

Vacation Confidence Index 2019

Year

Projected Total Spend

 

Average Spend

 

2010

$76 Billion

 

$1,653

 

2011

$89.7 Billion

 

$1,704

 

2012

$79.8 Billion

 

$1,565

 

2013

$81.1 Billion

 

$1,755

 

2014

$98.8 Billion

 

$1,895

 

2015

$85.5 Billion

 

$1,621

 

2016

$89.9 Billion

 

$1,798

 

2017

$101.1 Billion

 

$1,978

 

2018

$100.4 Billion

 

$1,936

 

2019

$101.7 Billion

 

$2,037

 

Source: Allianz Global Assistance USA

Methodology supplied by Allianz:

These are findings of an Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Allianz Global Assistance. For this survey, a sample of 1,005 Americans aged 18+ was interviewed by telephone from May 30 to June 2, 2019, via the Caravan Omnibus. The precision of random telephone polls is measured using a margin of error. In this case, the results are accurate to within +/- 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what the results would have been had all American adults been polled. Quota sampling and weighting were employed in order to balance demographics and ensure that the sample’s composition reflects that of the actual U.S. population, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Margins of error are wider among subsets of the population.

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